Events

Feb 27

Managing IAQ at Multiple Scales - from Urban to Personal Microenvironments

135 Reber Building
3:35 p.m. - 4:35 p.m.

ME 590 Seminar Speaker Series

Additional Information:

Abstract:
Indoor air quality (IAQ) is vital to human health, wellbeing and performance as people typically spend over 80% of their time indoors. The indoor pollutants people expose to originate from both indoors and outdoors. To devise an energy-efficient and cost-effective approach to improving IAQ, it is necessary to consider strategies across multiple scales – from the outdoor environment around buildings to inside buildings, to rooms, and to the microenvironment around the occupants that directly affect the human exposure and intake of the pollutants. In this talk, we present a 3-dimensional view of the IAQ engineering: the scales (of environments), the species (of pollutants) and strategies (of IAQ control). The objectives are to assess the potential and limits of the various source control, ventilation and air purification strategies across the different scale, and to develop an integrated approach for managing IAQ in an energy-efficient and cost-effective manner. Existing data from previous research on the effectiveness of various IAQ strategies and technologies at the different environmental scales will be discussed, including a layered approach to reduce the risk of airborne transmission of the COVID 19 virus. The talk will end with an outlook to the future challenges in IAQ research. 

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Apr 09

Shock-Wave / Boundary-Layer Interactions: Unsteady Physics and Flow Structure Interaction

135 Reber Building
3:35 p.m. - 4:35 p.m.

ME 590 Seminar Speaker Series

Additional Information:

Abstract:

Shock wave / boundary layer interactions (SBLIs) are an important phenomenon in high-speed flow that occur in supersonic and hypersonic aircraft inlets, aircraft control surfaces, missile base flows, nozzles, and rotating machinery. These interactions are often associated with severe boundary layer separation, which is highly unsteady, and exhibits high fluctuating pressure and heat loads. The unsteady motions are characterized by a wide range of frequencies, including low-frequency motions that are about two orders of magnitude lower than the integral-scale fluctuations in the upstream boundary layer. The low-frequency motions are particularly problematic for aircraft structures as they can excite high-amplitude vibration of thin panels, which can lead to fatigue and failure. In this seminar, we will discuss some recent experimental research on SBLIs induced by compression ramps where we (i) explore the physics that drive the low-frequency unsteadiness, and (ii) investigate how the low-frequency forcing by an SBLI drives the flow-structure interaction (FSI) of thin panels. The discussion will focus on the physics of SBLI unsteadiness and FSI derived from high-speed pressure-sensitive paint, high-speed particle image velocimetry, and digital image correlation.

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With more than 60 faculty members, 330 graduate students, and 1,000 undergraduate students, the Penn State Department of Mechanical Engineering embraces a culture that welcomes individuals with a diversity of backgrounds and expertise. Our faculty and students are innovating today what will impact tomorrow’s solutions to meeting our energy needs, homeland security, biomedical devices, and transportation systems. We offer B.S. degrees in mechanical engineering as well as resident (M.S., Ph.D.) and online (M.S.) graduate degrees in mechanical engineering. See how we’re inspiring change and impacting tomorrow at me.psu.edu.

Department of Mechanical Engineering

137 Reber Building

The Pennsylvania State University

University Park, PA 16802-4400

Phone: 814-865-2519